News | Administration

Students criticize administrators for limited, delayed response to grand jury decisions

  • Kiera Wood / Senior Staff Photographer
    DIE-IN | The day after a Staten Island grand jury chose not to indict the police officer who killed Eric Garner, students held a die-in in protest during the annual Tree Lighting Ceremony.

Three weeks after a Ferguson grand jury’s decision sparked national outcry about police brutality, Columbia and Barnard administrators held forums this week to discuss the trauma some students have felt in light of recent events.

But after the two discussions this week, students criticized the time between the start of the national protests and Columbia’s response to the issue.

Limited response from the colleges

Between the days immediately following the grand jury decision in the Michael Brown case and the announcements of the two discussions, response from undergraduate administrators was limited to one email sent on Nov. 25 to all students in Columbia College and School of Engineering and Applied Science, and two additional emails to an Office of Multicultural Affairs student listserv on Dec. 3 and Dec. 8, which included a list of resources including open hours in the Intercultural Resource Center and in the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

The Nov. 25 email, which was sent by the Undergraduate Student Life office, announced a conversation to be held that evening focused on the personal impact of the non-indictment in the Michael Brown case.

That meeting, which was scheduled at the same time as dozens of Columbia students joined the citywide protests, was attended by about 10 students. Attendees made posters with colored paper and pipe cleaners with headings like “#blacklivesmatter” and “How are you feeling?”

Law students take action

Students at the Law School were among the first to reach out to their school’s administrators to request concrete responses to the grand jury decisions and ensuing activism.

Last week, the Columbia Law School Coalition of Concerned Students of Color sent a letter asking Law School administrators to offer exam extensions to students dealing with trauma related to the recent grand jury decisions.

“In being asked to prepare for and take our exams in this moment, we are being asked to perform incredible acts of disassociation that have led us to question our place in this school community and the legal community at large,” the letter said.

Law School administrators ultimately informed students on Saturday that they could make accommodations to take their exams at a later date in light of recent events. The Law School also brought in a trauma specialist to speak with students, and announced that they were planning an open forum about the issues.

After seeing the Law School’s response, Columbia College Student Council members reached out to Columbia College Dean James Valentini on Dec. 8 to advocate that similar resources be made available for students.

“I think it’s overwhelming for people to be taking finals when they’re going through some extreme pain, so we spoke to Valentini, and said pretty unequivocally that we believe the accommodations made at the Law School needed to be provided here,” CCSC Vice President of Policy Sejal Singh, CC ’15, said. “There needs to be community discussions about these issues, accommodations of those issues.”

Singh said that she had been contacted by members of the Black Students Organization about how thankful students were for the resources Columbia offered after the death of Joshua Villa, a Columbia College first-year.

“They were also saying a lot of those resources were very much needed after the non-indictment of Daniel Pantaleo and Darren Wilson in the Eric Garner and Michael Brown cases, Singh said. “Many students of color obviously needed those resources, and I think it was telling the University didn’t provide them.”

"Many students of color obviously needed those resources, and I think it was telling the University didn't provide them."

— Sejal Singh, CC 15

Organizing open forums

The community discussions came this week, starting with an open forum on Monday evening hosted by Barnard’s Student Government Association and attended by Barnard President Debora Spar, Provost Linda Bell, and Dean Avis Hinkson, BC ’84, TC ’87.

Spar sent an email on Dec. 8 to invite students to the forum, which she credited as a Barnard SGA event. She cited the grand jury decisions—as well as the emotions students have been feeling as a result—as the primary reasons to hold the forum.

The email further commended students for participating in the recent protests.

“We recognize that the college experience is one that must speak to the whole student—that the conversations and events that take place outside the classroom are as vital to your Barnard education as a lecture or paper assignment,” the email read.

Still, some students at the SGA forum criticized the delay between the grand jury decisions and the administration’s response.

“The conversation happened too late. It is not everything,” SGA President Julia Qian, BC ’15, said at the conclusion of the forum on Monday. “It is something that we could start with.”

A similar meeting for students in Columbia Columbia, SEAS, and the School of General Studies took place on Dec. 10, and was attended by Columbia College Dean James Valentini, SEAS Dean Mary Boyce, and General Studies Dean Peter Awn.

Some students voiced concerns about how the meeting for CC, GS, and SEAS students was announced—in an email sent by the Undergraduate Student Life office on Tuesday.

The email, which was signed by Valentini, Boyce, and Awn, announcing the community forum  also encouraged students to contact their advisers to arrange academic accommodations if students feel that their work was affected by the decision. It also said that Counseling and Psychological Services would host extended hours and OMA would hold drop-in hours at the Intercultural Resource Center throughout the week.

Damon Xavier, CC ’17, said that he was one of a group of several students from BSO and the Barnard Organization of Soul Sisters who sent a letter to administrators on Monday asking “that safe spaces and open dialogue be created between administration, faculty, and students," among other demands.

Xavier felt that the student efforts to organize the forum were not sufficiently acknowledged by the deans, and he called the language of the email announcing the forum “vague and depoliticized.”

“Describing this as, ‘what has been happening in the nation, in our city, and on our campus in recent weeks’ does not accurately represent the purpose of this meeting and, in part, continues to refuse acknowledgement of what actually is going on,” Xavier wrote in an email to Spectator.

A spokesperson said in a statement on behalf of the three undergraduate deans that Wednesday’s event was held “because students have expressed frustration with and concern around the recent grand jury decisions,” and that the timing of the event was designed to “maximize opportunity for students to participate.”

The deans’ statement did not directly respond to questions about whether the students’ letter had had an impact upon the scheduling of the event.

Discussing inaction

At the meeting in Earl Hall Auditorium on Wednesday night, students brought up a number of concerns about the current campus climate—from microaggressions that students of color felt were directed at them in class, to their disappointment that University President Lee Bollinger did not choose to attend the meeting.

Approximately 40 students attended the meeting, many of them students of color. The meeting, intended as a safe space for students, was off the record. Students and administrators sat in a circle and passed around a microphone to speak.

Students, at times tearfully and in raised voices, expressed feelings of alienation at Columbia, frustration with the curriculum of Core classes, and anger at being asked to supply the answers that they felt are the deans’ job to supply.

Both students and administrators said after the forum that they would have wanted to see more students come to engage with these issues.

“What I feel is missing here is more presence of your peers who are not in underrepresented groups,” Boyce said.

“I am disappointed that President Bollinger, along with the majority of student council, failed to attend,” Xavier said of the meeting. “I am also disappointed that more of my undergraduate peers did not attend because I believe issues discussed during the meeting were issues that the entire student body should care about.”

María Muratalla Maes, CC ’17, said that for many students, attending the forum would have been unhealthy due to personal trauma related to the issues discussed. But for others, absence represented a chosen lack of engagement.

“It’s not like we don’t have studying to do, too,” she said. “They chose to be silent and to be passive, and in that passivity they are condoning that violence that this event was supposed to confront.”

Many students also demanded a written apology from administrators for the presence of New York Police Department officers at a die-in during the annual Tree Lighting Ceremony last week, in which students of color laid peacefully on the ground to protest the recent grand jury decisions.

“It’s not an us-versus-them issue,” Muratalla Maes said. “We are all a community, and we should be able to feel protected.”

A University spokesperson said in an email to Spectator, “The NYPD was not requested nor present for the tree lighting ceremony or the demonstration that took place during the tree lighting ceremony.”

However, six NYPD vans were on 114th Street during the protest.

After it ended, around 200 students marched down Broadway to the Intercultural Resource Center, on 114th Street between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue, which Public Safety defines as “off campus.”

As students marched past, additional police cars pulled up and parked at the intersection. Students toward the back of the protest had to pass through the police to get to the IRC, and officers remained after the protesters dispersed.

At Thursday’s University Senate plenary, Executive Committee Chair Sharyn O’Halloran said that whenever there is an event or protest on campus, Public Safety notifies the NYPD, adding that it does not always mean the police will come to campus.

O’Halloran explained that when the NYPD is brought in for a campus demonstration, University regulations must be followed, including a vote from a majority of a panel established by the USenate executive committee to determine “that a demonstration poses a clear and present danger to persons, property, or the substantial functioning of any division of the University.”

Business as usual

At Wednesday’s meeting, some students also voiced concerns about Orgo Night and what they characterized as racist language in the band’s past performances.

In response, Dean of Advising Monique Rinere and Interim Dean of Undergraduate Student Life Todd Smith-Bergollo met with Columbia University Marching Band members on Thursday afternoon to ask that they to cancel the event.

“The decision whether or not to cancel Orgo Night lies with the CUMB student leaders, as this is student event that is not school-sponsored," a statement from the Undergraduate Student Life office, sent to Spectator on Thursday, said.

Ultimately, CUMB decided to not cancel the performance, leading some students to call upon other students to boycott Orgo Night.

“We understand that this is a really sensitive time in which many of our fellow students are hurting, and it is for this reason that we feel, more than ever, students need an outlet for their anger and pain,” CUMB said in a statement sent to Spectator on Thursday. “We look forward to putting on the best show we possibly can and hope to see you there.”

However, at Barnard’s Midnight Breakfast, more than 60 students staged a silent sit-in, holding a large sign that said “#Business as usual,” and smaller signs that said “Black Lives Matter” and “End Police Brutality.” Student protesters said they felt that administrators had not responded adequately.

“It is essential that we maintain a campus environment where all voices can be heard and ideas exchanged, and over the course of the past week my colleagues and I have been proud to see Barnard students taking this seriously,” Hinkson said in an email to Spectator. Hinkson declined to comment at the event itself, asking Spectator to follow up in an email. “Im often asking students to sit and listen, but last night I was able to do the same for them.”

Barnard administrators closed the main campus gates on Thursday night and required that students show their CUIDs in order to enter, and in order to prevent CUMB from performing in the Barnard quad—a typical stop along CUMB’s post-Orgo Night route. CUMB never ultimately showed up to Barnard’s campus on Thursday night.

Moving forward

“We needed the administrators to hear our voices, because there is a problem when a dean is emailing us three weeks after an event about trauma,” Nissy Aya, CC ’15, said after Wednesday’s meeting.

Moving forward, students at Wednesday night’s forum said that they hoped administrators would be held accountable for the commitments discussed.

“I want them to actually address the issues and not just say they’re going to,” Rosalyn Ransaw, CC ’17, said. “I just want them to be transparent.”

Aaron Fisher, Emma Goss, and Clara Chan contributed reporting.

Photos by Kiera Wood (NYPD vans), Elizabeth Sedran (protest) and Angela Bentley (Barnard sit-in). Graphic by Emma Volk and Jenna Beers.

news@columbiaspectator.com | @ColumbiaSpec

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Anonymous posted on

Didn't Dean Boyce mention suffering at the Yule Log ceremony the day after? *note didn't read article, also that is not the same thing as a response, just wanted to mention it

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Anonymous posted on

I am amazed by the degree of individualized coddling this generation of Columbia students apparently requires. Grow up! Learn to juggle conflicting priorities and feelings, and accept the fact that everything is not about you. If you need your hand held every step of the way through college you're going to have a very tough go of it in the real world.

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Anonymous posted on

This is not representative of all Columbia students, only a vocal minority that HAS to find something to complain about.

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Anonymous posted on

This statement is totally true. The overwhelming majority of the student body ARE ignorant white kids. Same with the comments. A lot of ignorant white kids.

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Anonymous posted on

Thanks, I really believe that. I'm a former NYPD Student here and thankfully and I haven't had to encounter these people
but it's disheartening none the less. I worked in Bedford Stuyvesant and I'm feeling heartbroken today but I'm still plugging away at my final paper, and haven't asked for an extension.

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Anonymous posted on

Why do we want the administration to get involved in every step of the way?

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What do you want?!?! posted on

Do you want the admins to make every student sign a statement condemning the racist White System or be expelled? Do you want Black students' (importantly: SELF-IDENTIFIED) finals to be canceled?

What da FUQ do you people want???

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Shondrea Thornton CC'15 posted on

Hi. So this article was actually really misrepresentative of the work that has gone into these conversations. A few things that were asked of the administration (and have been asked for for years)

1. That the university invest in hiring more faculty of color and providing tenure to current faculty of color
2. That the administration begin by issuing proper responses to trauma and pain.
3. That the university acknowledge its role in the prison-industrial complex (google it, we're invested) and divest
4. That financial aid be a more transparent and honest process (no-loans is a myth), especially as the majority of students of color are on financial aid.
5. That the administration do their job of protecting ALL students, and not just the ones who think Deantini is cool for dumping water on his head

Just a few things. We know what we want.

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White-presenting mixed-race girl posted on

You are my hero. Thank you for explaining! Finally! Someone publicly explains a set of objectives! Spec's reporting of this has been so irresponsible and divisive. It's painted protesters as crazy radicals with no real aims, and while there has definitely been a rash of absurd comments on these articles coming from a not-so-small minority of racist students, there have also been a lot of genuine (and arguably quite reasonable) questions about the precise goals of particular protests (e.g. Midnight Breakfast). In the face of psychological pain, this kind of skepticism can seem callous, but by and large I think it comes from a place of truly wanting to understand what they know they haven't experienced.

Coming from a family where half the people are subject to racial injustice and the other half are beneficiaries of this, I've had to navigate this often myself, feeling uncomfortable with both sides. I pass, but one whole half of my family doesn't, and having lived most of my life with them, I understand their experiences, but am not personally subject to all of them. The other half, while lovely people by and large, do not understand what I have experienced, and are never certain what to DO when faced with those realities. It's hardly worth considering the outright racists on campus- they're not here to learn. But I think most students are (it's why they picked the famously protest-y, left-wing, NYC situated Columbia), and it requires a brief moment of patient explanation, even condescension, on the part of students who are in a position to teach. A brief moment, but still a moment.

Anyway, THIS is what Spec should have written, and, if they had, I think a lot of unpleasantness could have been avoided. You're awesome, and any student who disagrees with these goals, or doesn't see why they're important to the whole student body, and particularly students of color and other marginalized groups is a jerk.

Upvoting the fuck out of this.

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Anonymous posted on

Let's only hire faculty of color. Wouldn't that be great! And watch our US news ranking and the quality of our education plummet. I'm pretty sure a university headed by the champion of affirmative action is hiring as many faculty of color as it can without diluting the quality of the faculty. In case you are confused, I am saying the pool of talented professors of color is not the same quality as the general pool. That's not to say it should be that way, or that it will stay that way, but that's the way it is. Further, a university like Columbia needs to weigh performance against progressive policies.

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White-presenting mixed-race girl again posted on

That's not what she's saying, you missed the point. The point of seeking out more underrepresented voices is that they contribute something unique, important, and otherwise unheard to an academic environment. Even if what you say about relative quality were true, the argument is that the university should be more aggressive about finding as many talented academics of non-white, non-male, non-upperclass backgrounds as it can because their very background contributes to their quality. Put another way, a professor from a low income background, or a non-white background has something worth contributing that a white professor does not. And to preempt the obvious counter that "personal experience doesn't/shouldn't matter in academia," I'd like to suggest that it does, and that it is impossible to divorce ones personal experience from anything one writes or teaches. One only has to look to the long history of the restriction of literacy to see that academia has been largely shaped by a particular group of people, namely white males. We learned this in Lithum and CC, guys.

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Anonymous posted on

When I say "quality," I mean quality of research and scholarship. This is diluted when affirmative action policies are too aggressively pursued (there is a balance that is ideal), and which would cause Columbia as an institution to lag behind its peers.

Any other quality, a quality pertaining to diversity and experiences brought in by those less traditionally qualified, DOES NOT contribute to academic excellence as directly or significantly as does hiring the best faculty.

Affirmative action policies are already in place or at least sway hiring decisions. And this is good in moderate amounts. You are a radical in your view that such policies should be pursued even further. And as with are radicals, you are wrong.

The academic excellence of Columbia supersedes the great majority of issues, including this one.

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Spec: Please, Improve Your Journalistic Coverage posted on

This isn't a balance or informative article. Rather, it's a superficial reiteration of misdirected complaints by a handful of students who find blame the university for anything/everything. Why didn't the Spec engage, interview and report the views of 99.98% of the students who don't find blame in, but feel blessed to be at, the university.
What separates the Spec from the Daily Princetonian, Harvard Crimson, Cornell Sun and other quality student newspapers? Answer: fair coverage.

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Anonymous posted on

Those other papers report straight university news and facts. Spec just reports all opinion pieces and students personal agendas and complaints. It is annoying.

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Anonymous posted on

lol I don't think you've read the Prince or Crimson, they are not really better.

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They are better posted on

Yes, we have read the other student newspapers. And, yes, they do report on more pertinent stories more evenly and insightfully. Sorry spec. In fact, many other Ivy newspapers (including the Sun, Herald Crimson) have received recognition in various awards and rankings. Just google and compare.

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Anonymous posted on

WHY does the administration even need to comment on this?! From an objective perspective, it's unrelated. And even if it's necessary for universities as educators to speak out on these issues, these administrators are people; they can't be expected to represent anything more than their own opinions.

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Shondrea Thornton CC'15 posted on

That….literally what administrators are paid do…is to represent….the university….

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Anonymous posted on

Yawn. At least the protestors can continue to paper their resume's for their inevitable applications to law school

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Eh posted on

Very, very few employers find protesting a commendable activity; you need to be protesting an irrefutable argument. Otherwise you just come off as someone who is too politically opinionated and cannot function. You're supposed to solve these things through actual discourse, not shouting at walls and robots.

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Anonymous posted on

How about an update on Manhattanville, or the Presidental library bid?

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Update posted on

Gentrification efforts are still going strong and we aren't going to win.

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Anonymous posted on

Really? Because it's us or UChicago, and we already have the land ready, whereas Chicago does not. That is a large hurdle to jump over.

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Anonymous posted on

That's not what the articles are saying
?

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Anonymous posted on

here is an article from the Chicago Tribune saying just that: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-university-chicago-obama-library-20141210-story.html

It is behind a paywall, but you can view the source code and read the text by pressing control u on pc.

Here is an important quote:
"This is a really serious competition. It's not a done deal by any means" She said. "I won't make an argument on behalf of New York, but I will say an advantage they have, which is fortunate for them, (is that) for other purposes they have already identified, cleared and gone through all the public processes required. ... So it's done."

And:
"As far as land acquisition, New York already is far ahead."

Try to be more optimistic regarding your alma mater.

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Anonymous posted on

Uh, this is a private, non denomination school. I would prefer the administration to have no response on grand jury decisions around the country.

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Alumni posted on

No, you should not have your exams delayed because of a grand jury decision. It made little enough sense when applied to the Law School; at least they're studying law.

Please stop making our degrees worth less due to your weakness; suck it up like everyone else. So glad I didn't go to Columbia for Grad school; everyone at my Law School thinks this exam delay is absolutely ridiculous. Good luck telling your prospective lawyer boss person that you had to take time off from work due to a bad jury decision.

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Yes! posted on

I love hiring people who complain about the way things are! There was starting to be a shortage!

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Dr. Michael Hfuhruhurr posted on

“I think it’s overwhelming for people to be taking finals when they’re going through some extreme pain, so we spoke to Valentini, and said pretty unequivocally that we believe the accommodations made at the Law School needed to be provided here,” CCSC Vice President of Policy Sejal Singh, CC ’15, said.
.
Hmmmmm. Are you a mewling pseudo-adult bedwetter or a manipulator seeking a study advantage over your rational classmates? These are the questions.

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Alum posted on

Can't believe students are actually proud of these statements to the point of attaching names. Irreparable damage to your perceived work ethic. Good luck after graduation.

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Anonymous posted on

What about all the white people that are robbed, murdered, harassed, assaulted, murdered by black people on a daily basis in the city? Every time a student is attacked, check out the assailants photo. When are people going to get angry over this?

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LOOOOOOL posted on

call the cops why dont u

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A professor posted on

I am amazed by the antics of students who aim to transform the suffering of Eric Garner and Michael Brown into a matter of their own<\i> "trauma."

Suck it up! Horrifying things happen in the news all the time. And anyone unaware that American society undervalues Black lives wasn't paying attention.

Were finals postponed when Amadou Diallo's killers were acquitted? Or Timothy Stansbury's? Or Sean Bell's? I don't think so.

Stop whining to the administration. F*ck the system, but f*ck it yourselves! And take your finals on time.

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Anonymous posted on

I'm kind of disappointed you didn't use your name because that is the most reasonable thing I've heard all week and now I just want to take your class, whatever it is.

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Anonymous posted on

LOL white students scared their minority counterparts will have an ADVANTAGE because of postponed finals.

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Anonymous posted on

No, hard-working students worried that their institution will gain a reputation for being lax/overly accommodating and thus downgrading the perceived value of their own achievements (since the world is about as lax and accommodating as a rectal lunch). Glad I'm not in this class.

And you wonder why people call Americans lazy.

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A European posted on

Where I'm from, people think US-Americans are callous, but nobody thinks they are lazy. They work harder for less money with less job security and worse retirement benefits.

Also, good for you using torture tactics as a joke. You know what will also help you get hired? Being a human being instead of a fucking dickwad.

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Anonymous posted on

Google 'americans lazy' then come back to me. Or continue to assume that you speak for all of Europe.

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Anonymous posted on

lol my classmates are so out of touch with the reality of this world, it's gonna be hilarious when they graduate and life bashes them across the chin with a hard right hand of reality that leaves them unconscious.

Are we truly so spoiled, rich, and privileged that we feel as though our "feelings" are a valid excuse to stop the world from spinning? Your feelings don't count for shit. I'm sorry your mother or father never sat you down and explained that to you.

And this isn't to belittle mental disease such as depression of anxiety disorders. People who suffer from such ailments should actively seek the proper psychological help they need and they are the only ones who have a valid excuse in the eyes of society.

Rest of you are just little pussies that need to stop crying in your pussy juice.

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2014 posted on

if the complaint is that the university needs to be more compassionate overall, then sure, why not.

but the complaint, as i understand it, is that the university should have cancelled orgo night and delayed finals because of the brown/garner decisions. i'm sorry, but i just dont see it. do ukrainian students get to delay their finals? surely they're distressed by russia's offensive. do jewish students get to delay their finals? the har nof massacre last month was incredibly traumatic for them. what about nigerian students whose country is being ravaged by boko haram? typhoon hagupit injured 1000 and killed 18 people in the philippines.

where do you draw the line? these people are experiencing very real distress, but there is no movement to let them out of finals.

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not to mention... posted on

what about students from Buffalo NY whose hometown has a dozen plus people dead because of six feet of snow?

The sooner Columbia students realize that out there in the wide (and wild) world that the vase vast majority of people don't give a shit about you, the sooner you can be christened an adult. Face it--the school and its administrators, teachers, and staff are, by definition, the "Establishment"--to expect them to satisfactorily respond to students' "concerns" is a joke. Just because your parents care about you doesn't mean other adult give a shit what' you are "going through."

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Shondrea Thornton CC'15 posted on

That actually wasn't the complaint. Once again, this presents only half the side. The bulk of the conversation was actually around issues of making CU a safer, more just environment. Issues that were brought up were investments in private prisons, the low retention rate of students of color, as well as issues with the curriculum. Orgo Night and Finals were the tip of the conversation as on Wednesday, they were the most pressing issues.

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Shondrea Thornton CC'15 posted on

I really implore all the people saying that none of this represents them to represent themselves. I'm sure none of you attended any of these events yet you are absolutely certain you are being oppressed by the activists on campus. Here's a hint, Spec only tells half the tale. Regardless of whether you agree with anything, you all should be out there making your voices heard. Come out from anonymous. Set up your own forums. Go to these meetings. Otherwise, you all sound like hypocrites (though I'm sure you don't care). Either way, I look forward to seeing this "silent majority" organize and actually do something on this campus. Who knows, we might actually be on the same side of some stuff.

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Anonymous posted on

Most of us are too busy getting an actual education. We don't all have financial aid covering our tuition.

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Shondrea Thornton CC'15 posted on

Are you saying that those on financial aid aren't working to get their educations? Because if so, that 1) is woefully misinformed, both about how financial aid works here and I the work ethic of students and 2) the most ridiculous comment of the day. But whatever excuses help you through the day I guess...

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Al CC' 16 posted on

People of the comments,

My last attempt to discern the basis of your grief against the students voicing grievances against the school admin, the student body, the campus culture, etc. was met with the apparent dismissal and nullification of my deference of the conservative article due to my comment's perceived lack of substance and a apparently shocking lack of self awareness on my part.

For this reason I seek again to fill whatever void prevented me from articulating a legible response by reaching out to the active commentors of this section. I seek specifically to understand the insight brought forth by individuals such as "Anonymous", "A professor" and others who share in the opinions of these individuals. I seek to understand the basis for your grief against these students, I seek to understand the basis for the magnitude of your grievances which appears to be of a great scale given the quantity of the comments. That is to say "Why do you feel so strongly about other students having grief?" "Why does the expression of grief of a small minority of students require such a response?" I am aware of comments and interactions made on the spec section, bwog, on Bored@butler, and on social media so references can be made to them. I will listen to all evidence presented, anecdotal, personal, material, empirical.

I willfully condescend myself to the self proclaimed distributors of "common sense" "objective" truths on this comment section such as "Anonymous." The conveyors of pure logic, upholders, righteousness, and freedom. Ardent believers in intentionality, those with a penchant for justice. I seek to be educated and perhaps reformed into a virtuous individual with the capacity to discern and harken such unalienable indestructible pure forms to which we make reference to such as "freedom of speech" or "equality". I seek to find as well the sources which inform our untarnished, comprehensive understandings of activists, leftists, "SJW's." I'd like to know sources by which to cite the insightful views such as the notion that they are just complaining, whining, or otherwise taking advantage of existing discourses, attitudes, institutions, etc.

I only hope that "Anonymous" will take the time to explain to me how I might understand the basis of your grief and apply it to be a better more pure Columbia student, a hireable subject, a dismisser of half-truths, a producer of comments with positive points.

Help me o great, knowledgeable, pure, omniscient "anonymous."

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Al CC 16 posted on

Also teach me wittiness

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Anonymous posted on

It seems to me that "A professor" did not have problem with the students' grievances themselves, but with the way the students expected to be taken care of/ receive special treatment due to their grievances.
"A professor" did not take issue with the students' cause, he took issue with the fact that they wanted the school to provide academic accommodations so that they could deal with tragic events that had little to do with them personally. Horrible things happen everyday, but unless they happen to the student or to the student's family/friends, they are not a basis for giving the students a makeup final. By all means, fight to prevent those horrible things from happening, but it isn't the professors' jobs to write new exams and/or to arrange a times when there will be people available to proctor those exams so that you have time to be emotional about your or to fight for that cause.
If a cause is important to you, then you either need to make it work with your other commitments (i.e. school) or drop something from your schedule -- it is not up to other people to find time for your fight in their schedule.

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Jim Greenberg posted on

Millennial tudent activists to administration: "Please officially endorse, coopt and lead our student movement so that we can be sure it is wholly inauthentic, bureaucratized, and mandatory!"

lol. it is difficult to conceive of a lamer expression of student rebellion/activisim than this. One wonders if the reason they're focusing on school administrators is because they known no one else will give a damn, and because its easy and safe.

The administration will of course humor them, go through the motions, make the right proclamations, promise a renewed focus, hold "conversations" etc.

This will of course allow the "activists" to feel a sense of accomplishment, with minimal risk undertaken and nothing real accomplished. It is actually the perfect representation of all the failings of this generation.

What a laughable and embarrassing display.

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Anonymous posted on

An email of support was sent out to the Office of Multicultural Affairs list on 11/25 following the Ferguson verdict. It also outlined open, women of color, and men of color spaces to gather and talk.

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Anonymous posted on

What a bunch of pathetic losers. There are so many people battling real pain. Cancer. Heart disease. Multiple sclerosis. Etc. people with real stress who worry about their children serving in the military who may not come home. Etc. and then u have the poor little stressed out law students who can't take their finals omg

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Arafat posted on

Here are some interesting stats for discussion. They provide some interesting context, no?
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There are 193 white on black murders every year. There are 448 black on white murders. There are 2447 black on black murders. If there is an assault on black lives, it is a self-inflicted wound.

http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cj...

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Anonymous posted on

We'd better close the law school, and all other university programs, where abysmally ignorant students believe that educational administrators are in charge of judicial functions
of state and federal law enforcement.

Perhaps then, these students would have .time to inform themselves about the full spectrum of reality in this country,
including the daily occurrences of slaughter, mayhem and rape of innocent white people by violent blacks who are enabled by the ignorance of today's students and the
absence of concern for white victims of racism from our highest governmental officials.

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Anonymous posted on

We'd better close the law school, and all other university programs, where abysmally ignorant students believe that educational administrators are in charge of judicial functions
of state and federal law enforcement.

Perhaps then, these students would have .time to inform themselves about the full spectrum of reality in this country,
including the daily occurrences of slaughter, mayhem and rape of innocent white people by violent blacks who are enabled by the ignorance of today's students and the
absence of concern for white victims of racism from our highest governmental officials.

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Anonymous posted on

We'd better close the law school, and all other university programs, where abysmally ignorant students believe that educational administrators are in charge of judicial functions
of state and federal law enforcement.

Perhaps then, these students would have .time to inform themselves about the full spectrum of reality in this country,
including the daily occurrences of slaughter, mayhem and rape of innocent white people by violent blacks who are enabled by the ignorance of today's students and the
absence of concern for white victims of racism from our highest governmental officials.

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Read this posted on

Please read this letter to the editor in the Harvard Crimson. http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2014/12/17/harvard-law-school-take-exams/ It sums up the issue as well as any can sum it up.

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Anonymous posted on

If students are free to constatntly criticize the administration, wouldn't it seem fair that the administration should be free to criticize the students?

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Arafat posted on

So a BLACK MUSLIM - with quotes from the Qur'an on his Facebook page - ambushes two cops and kills them in cold blood.

I hope all you sc*m are feeling good about yourselves now for it is people like you who threw the kindling onto the fire.

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